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Danbury High School     43 Clapboard Ridge Road Danbury, CT 06811     (203) 797-4800

The Hatters' Herald

Danbury High School     43 Clapboard Ridge Road Danbury, CT 06811     (203) 797-4800

The Hatters' Herald

Danbury High School     43 Clapboard Ridge Road Danbury, CT 06811     (203) 797-4800

The Hatters' Herald

How much do students care about local politics?

How much do students care about local politics?

For the first time in over 20 years, the city of Danbury is under Democratic leadership. Mayor-elect Roberto Alves beat Dean Esposito, who held the position for one term. The City Council also shifted from Republican leadership to Democratic, moving from a 14-7 Republican majority to a 16-5 Democratic majority. In the 2021 election, Esposito defeated Alves by only 200 votes. However, with the recent election outcome, everyone is waiting to see what changes can be made in the local government in the next two years. But how will this affect the people in Danbury—most importantly—how much do the students at DHS care?

 

When speaking with three fellow DHS students about their knowledge of local government and politics, they shared their perspectives on the recent election. Mariam Bhavnagarwala says she cares a lot about local politics due to its impact on the average person. Bhavnagarwala states, “Advocating in local politics is the first step to being seen and heard.” Riya Pharsiyawar believes many students at DHS care; specifically, “the majority of students who care are in this room [Journalism class].” Gabrielly Araujo shares that “voting in any type of election is important because… you get to choose who you believe will benefit you when they are in office.” 

 

It is alarming that Pharsiyawar thinks only about 18 students at DHS care about local politics and voting. Recent elections show just how debated public schools can be, as they were one of the hottest topics in all mayoral debates. One of the Hatters’ Herald Senior Editors, Jenna Saltzmen, saw just how divisive the topic of education was between the candidates at their debate. The actions of Mayor-Elect Alves in the next two years will have a direct effect on the students at DHS, so shouldn’t students care? While education will affect students, a study conducted by Tisch College shows that young people are more likely to contribute in conversations about topics like gun control, abortion, inflation, and the climate. 

 

The Carnegie Corporation of New York shared data showing that 66.8% of Americans vote in presidential elections, while only 50.3% participated in the 2018 midterm election. However, nationwide, less than 15% of people show up for mayoral elections. This is concerning because while federal policy is important, local offices make decisions about schools and infrastructure, directly affecting the average person. If you can vote, use your voice and advocate for what you believe, and if you can’t vote, encourage those around you to do so. 

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About the Contributor
Shea Moore, Staff Writer
Hi I am Shea this is my first year working on The Hatters Herald as a Staff writer. I have enjoyed writing for my peers at DHS. Outside of The Hatters Herald I am also an Officer for Word Warriors. I am passionate about literature and writing and hope that I can have a career as a writer. Outside of school I enjoy baking and trying new recipes, such as perfecting my signature chocolate chip cookie recipe.

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    Diane LaPineNov 22, 2023 at 8:00 pm

    Thank you for writing this article. We need to encourage young people to vote . Only 34 percent of registered voters in Danbury voted in the Municipal election this year! Councilwoman-elect Diane LaPine ❤️

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