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Danbury High School     43 Clapboard Ridge Road Danbury, CT 06811     (203) 797-4800

The Hatters' Herald

Danbury High School     43 Clapboard Ridge Road Danbury, CT 06811     (203) 797-4800

The Hatters' Herald

Danbury High School     43 Clapboard Ridge Road Danbury, CT 06811     (203) 797-4800

The Hatters' Herald

The Amazon Rainforest & its Indigenous Tribes

In Brazil, the Amazon Rainforest houses numerous Indigenous communities. However, both the rainforest and its inhabitants face constant threats from deforestation, mining, and other forms of exploitation. Vanda Witoto, Elaize Farias, and Marinete Almeida are three remarkable women who have taken it upon themselves to fight for the rights of these communities and the preservation of the Amazon Rainforest.
An+aerial+view+of+an+ecological+research+station+in+the+Brazilian+Amazon.+Safeguarding+the+health+of+the+world%E2%80%99s+largest+rainforest+is+crucial+for+supporting+indigenous+communities%2C+protecting+biodiversity%2C+and+addressing+climate+change.+
Michael Dantas
An aerial view of an ecological research station in the Brazilian Amazon. Safeguarding the health of the world’s largest rainforest is crucial for supporting indigenous communities, protecting biodiversity, and addressing climate change.

In Brazil, the Amazon Rainforest houses numerous Indigenous communities. However, both the rainforest and its inhabitants face constant threats from deforestation, mining, and other forms of exploitation. Vanda Witoto, Elaize Farias, and Marinete Almeida are three remarkable women who have taken it upon themselves to fight for the rights of these communities and the preservation of the Amazon Rainforest. Together, these three women have become a powerful force for change in Brazil, inspiring others to join the fight to protect the Amazon Rainforest and Indigenous Rights.

 

Vanda Witoto, a courageous woman residing on the outskirts of Manaus, Brazil, has dedicated herself to advocating for the representation and well-being of her community. Historically neglected by authorities, Vanda has led the charge in addressing numerous challenges faced by her community, such as the lack of a sewage system and inadequate waste management. She highlights that when the rain arrives, it washes community trash into the nearby Amazon River and the Rio Negro, posing a serious threat to the environment and the local population’s health.

 

Despite these challenges, Vanda has emerged as a community leader, leveraging her nursing background and unwavering commitment to improving the lives of her fellow citizens. She has fought for representation and the health of Amazon communities like hers for years. Only in January 2021 did piped water become available in the tribe’s park, a success owed to Vanda’s efforts and those of activists like her.

 

Vanda’s work stands as a testament to the power of community-led initiatives and the significance of fighting for the rights of the most vulnerable members of society. Her efforts serve as an inspiration for all of us to contribute to protecting the environment and ensuring universal access to life’s essentials.

 

Elaize Farias is conducting crucial work through her journalism at Amazônia Real. She and her team have been traveling and interviewing individuals directly affected by the government’s neglect of the Amazon, especially indigenous communities. Farias believes in prioritizing the voices of marginalized people, not placing them second, a principle reflected in her reporting. When co-founding Amazônia Real, she aimed to shine a spotlight on indigenous knowledge, perspectives, and traditional values of cooperation.

 

Marinete Almeida is a passionate advocate for the Amazon Rainforest and its indigenous inhabitants. She firmly believes that environmental rights, indigenous rights, and women’s rights are inherently intertwined and warrant more discussions. Marinete is part of a growing community dedicated to fighting for the rights of indigenous communities and the preservation of the Amazon Rainforest.

 

Regrettably, deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest hit a 15-year high in 2021 due to funding cuts and illegal logging. The Amazon Rainforest not only shelters numerous Indigenous communities but also plays a pivotal role in addressing climate change and preserving biodiversity. Action must be taken to save this ecosystem as it is vital for the planet’s survival.

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About the Contributor
Gabrielly Araujo, Staff Writer
Hello! My name is Gabrielly, and this is my first year writing for the Hatters Herald. I joined this class because it offers the opportunity to write about anything and everything you wish to. Personally, I have a deep-seated passion for music and a fondness for binge-watching TV shows.

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